Fortune

Taming the Behemoths

D.C.’s bitter partisans can agree on at least one thing: The big tech companies need reining in.

WILLIAM BARR, in his January confirmation hearings to become the U.S. attorney general, entered into the lexicon a valuable, if redundant, expression to describe the biggest technology companies in the land. “I think a lot of people wonder how such huge behemoths that now exist in Silicon Valley have taken shape under the nose of the antitrust enforcers,” said Barr, an establishment Republican lawyer from central casting—and therefore

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