The New York Times

Otherworldly: Sublime New Fantasy Fiction

BOLD EXPERIMENTS WITH NARRATION, STRUCTURE AND LANGUAGE INVIGORATE ALL THREE OF THESE BOOKS.

I can’t stop noticing narration lately, partly because I keep reading books in which the narrators demand attention: unreliable narrators, narratives cobbled together into a document, second-person narration that leaps off the page to address me directly. I’m delighted to see this kind of experimentation, since it invigorates genres of longer lineage, like the venerable epic fantasy, and helps mint new coin out of the old metal of fairy tales.

Jenn Lyons’s door-stopping debut, THE RUIN OF KINGS (Tor, $24.99), is the first volume in a series called Chorus of Dragons. A story weaving empires, kings and queens, gods and goddesses into its telling, it’s as epic as fantasy gets, a 560-page behemoth that takes me back to my teenage reading, when I measured my fantasyland sojourns in mass-market inches.

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