Nautilus

The Case for Being Skeptical of Moral Outrage

If, as the research shows, our moral outrage is highly sensitive to actions but not consequences, we might want to treat feelings of moral outrage—whether others’ or our own—skeptically. Photograph by Vjacheslav_Kozyrev / Flickr

he episode last month at the Lincoln Memorial, involving the boys from Covington Catholic High School, and a Native American man, was like so many Internet-born controversies before it: It spawned vituperative , , and of the reactions to the reactions. Altogether it was exactly the type of politically charged commotion that nobody could, arguably meaningless event driven by an emotion that social media is making more and more familiar to all of us: moral outrage.

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