STAT

Opinion: ‘Overlapping surgery’ is safe for most patients, but not all

Overlapping surgery, in which a surgeon works on two operations scheduled at the same time, has risks as well as benefits.
Source: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

Tens of millions of Americans undergo surgery each year. They expect their surgeon to be in the operating room for the entire procedure. That’s not always the case — the surgeon may have two operations scheduled at the same time.

Although the notion of a surgeon being in two places at once may seem worrisome, our new research suggests that overlapping surgery is generally a safe practice. There are some groups, however, for which it may not be.

Operating rooms are costly to run and wait times for skilled surgeons can be long. The pressure to. When doing this, surgeons typically delegate the routine parts of an operation, like suturing an incision, to physician assistants or surgical trainees, while they perform the critical parts of an overlapping case in a different operating room.

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from STAT

STAT2 min read
Roche Backpedals And Agrees To Provide A Solution For Covid-19 Tests In The Netherlands
In a startling about-face, Roche has agreed to release the recipe for a liquid solution that Dutch laboratories need to run a coronavirus test.
STAT11 min read
With Masks Dwindling, A Hospital’s Covid-19 Crisis Team Searches For A Way Out
With the coronavirus bearing down and employees insisting on better protection, a hospital's leaders ask: Where can we get more masks?
STAT4 min read
What If Hydroxychloroquine Doesn’t Work? What If It Does? Right Now, We Don’t Know
An old malaria medicine, hydroxychloroquine, has gone viral on the internet. But is it really an antiviral drug?