The Atlantic

Why Are So Few Male Students Studying Abroad?

More than 300,000 college students went overseas in 2016–17. Just a third of them were men.
Source: d3sign / Getty

Even as new enrollments of international students at colleges in the United States have declined over the past two years, the number of American students studying abroad continues to grow. Some 332,700 students studied overseas in the 2016–17 academic year, up 17 percent from five years ago and 27 percent from a decade ago.

But one group of students is underrepresented in the surge of undergraduates going overseas: men. In 2016–17, women accounted for more than two-thirds of American students studying abroad, a proportion that has remained constant for more than a decade.

Colleges have the gender disparity on the simple fact that women outnumber men on campuses

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from The Atlantic

The Atlantic5 min readPolitics
Iran Is Acting Like the International Villain of Trump’s Prophecy
Any number of relatively mundane scenarios now have the potential to escalate U.S.-Iran tensions—from a fire at a militia base to the seizure of an oil tanker to the signal-jamming of a drone.
The Atlantic5 min read
Has College Gotten Too Easy?
An astonishing number of students start college in America without finishing it: Roughly 40 percent of college enrollees don’t go on to get a degree within six years of starting to work toward one. The good news is that in recent decades things have
The Atlantic3 min read
A Book That Examines the Writing Processes of Two Poetry Giants
William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge once spent a grueling year in nature, subsequently producing some of their most resonant works.