NPR

Opinion: 90,000 Vodka Bottles Were Bound For North Korea, While Its People Starve

NPR's Scott Simon reflects on the seizure of 90,000 bottles of Russian vodka destined for North Korea's elite. A look at what this means for the regime's treatment of regular citizens.
Vodka bottles were seized by the customs authorities in the port of Rotterdam, on Feb. 26, destined for North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and his army command. Source: Robin Utrecht

This week, just as President Trump and Kim Jong Un prepared to meet in Hanoi — for what turned out to be their abrupt and unproductive summit — Dutch customs officials discovered and seized about 90,000 bottles of Russian, .

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