The Atlantic

Where Have All the Men Without College Degrees Gone?

Economists are trying to understand the steady decline of non-college-educated men in the labor market.
Source: G. Merrill / Getty

In the late 1960s, almost all prime-working-age men, typically defined as 25 to 54, worked—nearly . That figure had dipped to 85 percent by 2015—a decline most acutely felt among men without college degrees. The trend of men dropping out of the labor force, particularly non-college-educated men, has been building for more than six decades. It has been a slow withdrawal, but a steady one—a flow that began with a sharp decline in opportunities for men who dropped

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