The Guardian

Halal holiday bookings soar as Muslims opt for the Med

Tourism industry wakes up to the rapidly growing earning potential of the Islamic economy
Tourists in Antalya, where halal-friendly resorts are springing up. Photograph: Valery Sharifulin/Tass

It’s a magnet for sun-deprived tourists from northern Europe, drawn to its long sandy beaches, pretty coves and ancient sites. Along Turkey’s Turquoise Coast, holidaymakers down exotic cocktails and ice-cold beers between dips in the sparkling Mediterranean and snoozing on the sun-lounger.

But an increasing number of hotels in and around Antalya are turning away from the traditional resort fare of booze and bare flesh in order to attract a new and growing clientele: Muslim tourists.

Halal travel, catering for Muslim requirements, is undergoing a boom. Worth $177bn (£136bn) in

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