The New York Times

By the Book: Laurie Halse Anderson

THE AUTHOR, MOST RECENTLY, OF THE MEMOIR “SHOUT” DOESN’T SHUN ANY GENRES: “THAT’S LIKE AVOIDING COLORS OR PARTS OF THE FLAVOR SPECTRUM. I WANT ALL KINDS OF STORIES ON MY PLATE.”

Q: What books are on your nightstand?

A: In English I have “Black Leopard, Red Wolf,” by Marlon James, “White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide,” by Carol Anderson, and “Here to Stay,” by Sara Farizan. I generally read several books at a time, and I try to make sure that one of them is always in Danish, my second language. My current Danish book is “Mit Lykkelige Land,” by Grevinde Alexandra and Rikke Hyldgaard, a delightful examination of what makes Denmark such a terrific place to live.

Q: What’s the last great book you read?

A: “,” by Roxane Gay. If you haven’t read it yet, start right now. (Come back to this Q. and A. when you’re done, please.) Gay’s experience of trauma, of shame, of being a fat (her preferred word), black woman in America, of navigating spaces that

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