NPR

College Completion Rates Are Up, But The Numbers Will Still Surprise You

To unlock the benefits of going to college, you need to earn a degree. But average completion rates in the U.S. are surprisingly low and can vary widely depending on what type of school you attend.
Source: LA Johnson

Go to college, we tell students. It's a ticket out of poverty; a place to grow and expand; a gateway to a good job. Or perhaps a better job. But just going to college doesn't mean you'll finish. To unlock those benefits — you'll need a degree.

And yet for millions of Americans, that's not happening. On average, just 58 percent of students who started college in the fall of 2012 had earned any degree six years later, according to the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center.

While the numbers are up overall, experts say they're far too low and can vary widely depending on what type of school you attend. On average, four-year private schools graduate more

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