NPR

'The Lost Gutenberg' Traces One Bible's 500-Year Journey

The depth of Margaret Leslie Davis' research on the tome's history cannot be understated — her writing is straightforward and, at times, heartbreaking, but outstanding reporting lies at the core.
An illustration depicting Johannes Gutenberg taking the first proof off his printing press. Source: Bettmann Archive

One of the first things I did when I moved to Austin a decade ago was visit the Gutenberg Bible housed in the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas.

As a bibliophile, the importance of that book was not lost on me. However, the impact of Johannes Gutenberg's surviving bibles as cultural treasures and book collectors' dreams was something I ignored. That is no longer the case. Margaret Leslie Davis' , which traces one Bible's 500-year journey, is an informative,

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