Los Angeles Times

Racing experts discuss the future of the sport after rash of horse deaths at Santa Anita

LOS ANGELES - Santa Anita is inching toward its projected March 29 opening after having closed for live racing on March 5 following a dramatic increase in the number of horse fatalities. Since Dec. 26, 22 horses have died either in racing or training. What happened at Santa Anita has been a mystery that remains unsolved. When the track reopens, the stakes are very high and all eyes will be on horse safety.

The Los Angeles Times gathered a roundtable of three well-known experts with more than a century of knowledge working in the horse racing industry to try and dig down into what went wrong at Santa Anita and where things go from here.

On the panel are Alan Balch, a former Santa Anita executive who has also worked with other horse breeds, and is executive director of California Thoroughbred Trainers; Joe Harper, president and chief executive officer at Del Mar, who

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times2 min read
Melvin Gordon's Late Fumble Dooms Chargers In Loss To Titans
NASHVILLE, Tenn. - An already flustering season for the Los Angeles Chargers reached a new low Sunday when they lost by inches and seconds to the Tennessee Titans, 23-20. The game was decided when Melvin Gordon fumbled into the end zone when trying t
Los Angeles Times3 min read
With Injuries Adding Up, USC Fills In The Holes To Shut Down Tate And Arizona
LOS ANGELES_One by one, key defenders continued to fall, each injury its own cruel twist of fate for the USC Trojans, whose season teetered on a razor's edge. Two of USC's starting cornerbacks were already sidelined. A third was a game-time decision,
Los Angeles Times4 min read
Hurdles Champion Dalilah Muhammad Is 'A Tiger Walking Alone In The Jungle'
LOS ANGELES - Now the truth can be told about Dalilah Muhammad's dazzling performance at the recent world track championships. After some jitters leading up to the big day, the USC alumnus woke to a sense of calm on the morning of the women's 400-met