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In Florida, Doctors See Climate Change Hurting Their Most Vulnerable Patients

The medical community in Florida is increasingly sounding the alarm about the health risks associated with rising temperatures.
"When you work in the streets," Jorge says, "you really feel the change." Source: Maria Alejandra Cardona for NPR

Every week, Jorge needs to earn $364.08. His handwritten budget is taped to the wall of the windowless shed where he lives in Miami. Inside the tiny space, there's barely enough room for a twin bed and a battered dresser; his kitchen consists of a blender and a microwave. There's no running water, and mosquitoes fly in through the open door.

The little that he earns needs to cover more than just his living expenses — Jorge has diabetes and cancer to manage, and he needs to support his five children back home in Ecuador.

To survive, Jorge, who requested that his last name

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