NPR

Researchers Are Surprised By The Magnitude Of Venezuela's Health Crisis

A report from Johns Hopkins University and Human Rights Watch finds an alarming decline in the quality of health care across the country.
A patient at San Juan de Dios Hospital in Caracas, Venezuela. Source: Barcroft Media/Getty Images

Venezuela is in the midst of "a major, major emergency" when it comes to health.

That's the view of Dr. Paul Spiegel, who edited and reviewed a new report from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the international group Human Rights Watch. Released this week, the study outlines the enormity of the health crisis in Venezuela and calls for international action.

The health crisis began in 2012, two years after the economic crisis began in 2010. But it took a drastic turn for the worse in 2017, and the situation now is even more dismal than researchers expected.

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