NPR

Silicon Valley Has Its Tech Campuses. Now It Wants A Monument

Tourists are flocking to California to see the origins of their favorite tech companies. Now there might be a monument about Silicon Valley's glory.
Apple Park's visitor center has a store, cafe and roof with views of the main building for the public. Source: James Tensuan for NPR

As much as Silicon Valley is an actual place, it has no official borders or capital. It's a nickname, not a name on a map. But now there might be a monument about its glory.

The San Jose City Council approved a design competition for a landmark that would symbolize the tech industry's power and influence. There isn't a single

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