The Atlantic

How Sri Lanka’s Christians Became a Target

The island nation’s religious minority was rarely threatened. The Easter bombings changed that.
Source: Eranga Jayawardena / AP

The deadly bombings in Sri Lanka over the weekend follow a pattern of religious terror that has become grimly familiar around the world. The attackers targeted churches on Easter Sunday, when Christians would be gathered in large numbers and vulnerable during worship. They also chose crowded and exposed public spaces, including hotels likely to be hosting foreign tourists.

And they may have been associated with an Islamist militant cause: On Tuesday, the Islamic State claimed responsibility, although this has not been independently verified. Sri Lankan officials have that at least one local Islamist group was involved in the attacks, and that the attacks may have been carried out in retaliation for the white-nationalist shooting spree at mosques

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