NPR

In 'Nanaville,' Anna Quindlen Writes Of Her Adventures In Grandparenting

For decades, Quindlen has been channeling Baby Boomers' concerns, from motherhood and life-work balance to aging and downsizing. Her new book comes with a stern warning: Grandparents, know thy place.

I often refer to my grandson as an ambulatory antidepressant, a vivacious antidote to a time of life that has included the loss of my parents and the constant lashing of worrisome news.

Anna Quindlen ascribes similar jolts of joy to her grandson in her latest book, Nanaville: Adventures in"Sometimes Arthur sees me and yells 'Nana!' in the way some people might say 'ice cream!' and others say 'shoe sale!' No one else has sounded that happy to see me in many many years."

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from NPR

NPR4 min read
'Exalting The Banal To The Monumental' Through California Skate Parks
The state that gave birth to modern skateboarding is home to concrete playgrounds that are works of art in the eyes of photographer Amir Zaki: "They become more imaginative and open as spaces."
NPR2 min read
La Santa Cecilia: 'We Are As American As Apple Pie And Tacos'
The Grammy Award-winning group's self-titled album is packed with political messaging and brims with hope.
NPR4 min read
Major Crackdown In Egypt Sweeps Up Activists, Children — And At Least 1 U.S. Citizen
Protesters, schoolchildren and some of the government's most prominent critics have all been detained in a government clampdown. So was a 22-year-old American college student, accused of spying.