NPR

Students In Mozambique Are Afraid The Winds Will Blow Them Away

Cyclone Idai damaged over 600 schools in Mozambique. Teachers and administrators struggle to rebuild and keep kids in class in the aftermath.
Seventh-grade teachers Rita Ibrahim John, left, and Anotinia Marquez Bero, right, must share a single room to teach their two classes. Cyclone Idai destroyed 32 classrooms at Eduardo Mondlane Primary Completion School in Mozambique. Source: Tendai Marima for NPR

School is harder than it's ever been for 13-year-old Antonia Manuel Tom, a seventh grader at Eduardo Mondlane Primary Completion School in Mozambique.

She's got no textbooks or notebooks. She doesn't get enough to eat. And when rain begins to fall, she and her classmates grow nervous. "I'm scared if another cyclone comes, it will take our house and the wind will blow us all away," she says.

When Cyclone Idai hit the shores of Mozambique on March 14,

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