The New York Times

CORRECTION: By the Book: Ruth Reichl

THE FOOD WRITER AND AUTHOR, MOST RECENTLY, OF THE MEMOIR ‘SAVE ME THE PLUMS’ WAS 10 WHEN SHE READ HENRY MILLER. ‘IF IT’S OVER HER HEAD, SHE SIMPLY WON’T UNDERSTAND IT,’ HER MOTHER SAID.

Q: What books are on your nightstand?

A: At the moment there’s a great pile of books by friends and colleagues that are just about to see the light of day. I have, of course, promised to read them all yesterday. They include Monique Truong’s wonderful “The Sweetest Fruits”; Jeff Gordinier’s poetic take on the chef René Redzepi, “Hungry”; Kevin Alexander’s “Burn the Ice”; and Adam Platt’s “The Book of Eating.” I’m excited about Mark Arax’s “The Dreamt Land”; the excerpt I read last year was an extraordinary piece of reporting. Also on the pile, “Wayfarer,” by James S. Rockefeller Jr. (related to Standard Oil on his father’s side and Andrew Carnegie on his mother’s), which boasts one of the best opening paragraphs I’ve encountered. And

This article originally appeared in .

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

Related Interests

More from The New York Times

The New York Times10 min read
It's a New Morning for Jennifer Aniston
Fifteen years after “Friends,” she is returning to TV in Apple’s “The Morning Show” as a news anchor dealing with ageism, sexism and her co-host’s misconduct.
The New York Times3 min read
Bieber Says Childhood Fame Opened Door to Using 'Heavy Drugs'
Justin Bieber was discovered at age 13. Within a couple of years, he was a pop superstar and had begun amassing millions of dollars and fans. That kind of fame at such a young age was perilous and led him to make “terrible decisions,” he said Monday
The New York Times5 min readPsychology
The Awkward but Essential Art of Office Chitchat
We regret to inform you that you need to make small talk with your co-workers. Here’s how to master it.