The Atlantic

You Probably Shouldn’t Bring CBD Oil to an Airport

The substance’s sudden ubiquity might make it seem perfectly legal. Federal law enforcement sees things differently.
Source: Gena Melendrez / Shutterstock

Most Americans probably know it’s a bad idea to bring weed to the airport. Cannabis has been federally illegal since the 1930s, and one of modern air travel’s most prominent features is the layers of federal law-enforcement inspection one must traverse in order to board a plane. Even in states that have legalized marijuana for recreational use, carrying too much of it through TSA can get you arrested; the agency’s official policy is that travelers can’t even bring medically prescribed cannabis through security.

But what about cannabidiol? CBD, as it’s more commonly known, can be derived from both hemp and marijuana plants, and it has among American consumers in the past two years as a purported salve for almost any ailment you can think of, including anxiety, chronic pain, inflammation, nausea, epilepsy, and acne. It can be eaten, vaped, or applied to the body in lotion, and even Coca-Cola has in entering the market. But like tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC—the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana—CBD exists in a state of conflicting legality, depending on your jurisdiction.

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