The Guardian

Getting a measles vaccination isn't a personal choice – it's a social responsibility | Robert Reich

The core issue is the common good. Measles travels through the air – and if enough people opt out of vaccinations, they put everyone at a higher risk
‘Parents have a right to choose what happens to their own children, of course. But the right isn’t absolute.’ Photograph: Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

I remember having measles as a kid. Believe me, it was no fun. Also, measles could cause birth defects if a pregnant women got infected. If you were elderly, measles could be fatal.

Eventually, after vaccinations became nearly universal in America, measles was declared eliminated from the US in 2000.

But now the measles are back – already surpassing 700 cases this year, in 22 states. So far, 66 people have been hospitalized, a third of them with pneumonia.

What happened? We stopped vaccinating

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