NPR

Maria Butina Says She Was 'Building Peace.' That's Not How The Feds See It

The Russian agent gave an interview to NPR from the detention center where she has been in custody since last summer. She denies being a spy or taking part in election interference.

Maria Butina says this is all a big misunderstanding.

Was she part of the vast Russian government effort to influence politics within the United States?

"Absolutely not," she said.

The Russian woman who has pleaded guilty to conspiring to serve as a foreign agent inside the United States says she simply didn't know she was supposed to register.

As for being an intelligence operative, an agent provocateur or any of the other things of which she has been accused, Butina said those accusing her don't know her.

"It wouldn't be appropriate to say that this was all one grand giant plan and I'm a part of some grand giant plan," she said Thursday. "There is no proof of

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