Fortune

In the Land of Giants

America’s corporate colossi are using their positional advantage to get even larger. Why competitors, workers, and consumers should be worried.

IT’S WELL UNDERSTOOD in the United States that in recent decades, the spoils of the nation’s economic growth have gone disproportionately to the wealthiest few. But a similar phenomenon exists among U.S. corporations. More and more of their collective revenues are concentrated in a relatively small number of large firms: the corporate giants.

Look no further than the Fortune 500 in this issue. Last year, America’s 500 largest corporations tallied a record $13.7 trillion

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