The Guardian

Racism, sexism, Nazi economics: Estonia's far right in power

Until recently seen as a model nation, Estonia’s politics are turning darker
An activist protests against a meeting of Jaak Madison of Estonia’s far-right EKRE party and Marine Le Pen in Tallinn. Photograph: Hendrik Osula/AP

A shadowy “deep state” secretly runs the country. A smart immigration policy is “blacks go back”. Nazi Germany wasn’t all bad. None of these statements would be out of place in the darker corners of far-right blogs anywhere in the world. But in Estonia as of last month, they are among the views of government ministers.

Since emerging from the Soviet shadow three decades ago, Estonia has gained a reputation as a country with a , a vibrant free media and broadly progressive politics. But as in many European countries, Estonia’s far right has been edging upwards in the polls in recent years, and nobody was all that surprised when the nationalist EKRE party won 19 out of 101 seats in . The real shock

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