Los Angeles Times

How 'Vader Immortal' became Lucasfilm's 'Star Wars' bet on the future of VR and memory design

This summer, visitors to Disneyland in Anaheim, Calif., and Florida's Walt Disney World will be able to enter the universe of "Star Wars" with the opening of Galaxy's Edge, a 14-acre land with ambitions to offer unprecedented levels of play in the theme park space.

Fly the Millennium Falcon, build a droid, construct a lightsaber or engage in a battle for control of the land itself.

But there are limits. You won't be able to take the land's fancy new lightsabers into immediate duels. And since Galaxy's Edge is set in the timeline of the current trilogy, don't expect to play alongside Darth Vader, at least until Disney concocts a special event to make that happen.

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times2 min read
Yosemite's 'Firefall' Glow Is A No-go, But You May Still See A Great Sunset On El Capitan
Yosemite's annual "firefall" phenomenon likely won't appear this year, according to Yosemite National Park. The stunning glow best seen the last two weeks in February depends on the sunset's waning light striking a glistening waterfall on El Capitan'
Los Angeles Times4 min read
New Bullet Train Plan Paints Optimistic Picture, But Opposition Continues To Grow
Every other year, the California bullet train authority issues a business plan to support its cause, and this year's 168-page document came out this month with words that are obvious by now: "Building the nation's first truly high-speed rail system i
Los Angeles Times5 min readPsychology
Sandy Banks: I Only Took Three Years Of High School Math, Escaped With A 'D' And Turned Out OK
I've never managed to master much beyond the nuts and bolts of math. I was an honor student who could ace almost every subject, but ninth grade geometry tripped me up. I slipped through with a C, but needed three tries to pass trigonometry, with a D.