The Guardian

'Stop it!' Japanese women turn to app to stop groping on trains

Digi Police enables victims of molesters to notify fellow passengers of harassment
‘Thanks to its popularity, the number [of downloads] is increasing by about 10,000 every month,’ said police. Photograph: Behrouz Mehri/AFP/Getty Images

Almost two decades after the introduction of women-only train carriages, female commuters in Japan are turning to technology to tackle molesters on packed rush-hour trains.

The Digi Police app enables victims of groping to activate a voice

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