NPR

Shinzo Abe Or Abe Shinzo? Japan's Foreign Minister Tells Media To Change The Order

Taro Kono said he plans to ask overseas news outlets to write Japanese names with the family name first, as is the custom in Japan. But some wonder why the suggestion is coming now.
Japan's Foreign Minister Taro Kono plans to ask overseas news outlets to write Japanese names with the family name first, as is the custom in Japan. Kono is seen here last month in Washington. Source: Brendan Smialowski

Japan's foreign minister is making headlines — by pushing back on the headlines themselves.

At issue: the order in which foreign media write and say Japanese names.

In a news conference Tuesday, Foreign Minister Taro Kono said he plans to ask overseas news outlets to write Japanese names with the family name first and given name

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