The Atlantic

Trump Was Right Not to Sign the Christchurch Call

The pledge to eliminate extremist content online is antithetical to the American understanding of free expression.
Source: Yoan Valat via Reuters

Last week, the prime minister of New Zealand and president of France presented the Christchurch Call—a pledge to “eliminate terrorist and violent extremist content online.” Eighteen countries and all major tech companies signed up, but Donald Trump’s administration issued a statement declining to join them. Critics of the administration imputed the darkest of motives: It must oppose the pledge because it wants to make the world safe for violent extremists, perhaps especially the right-wing zealots who applauded the massacre of 51 people in Christchurch, New Zealand, itself two months ago.

You can read the Christchurch Call . I defy you to find anything objectionable about

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