The Atlantic

The Education Scandal That's Bigger Than Varsity Blues

Rich kids are enrolled in college at three times the rate of poor kids.
Source: Yulia-Images / Getty

It’s hard to snatch attention from the jaws of intrigue, and Varsity Blues had it all. There were fake SAT scores, a shady deal maker, and wealthy parents eager to lay waste to anything standing in front of their children on the road to a selective college—the vaunted status symbols that they are. This exposes the gritty underbelly ofa common refrain went.

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from The Atlantic

The Atlantic2 min readHappiness
The Atlantic Daily: Finding Happiness During a Pandemic
Finding happiness under fraught circumstances can be challenging. Our new column aims “to give you the tools you need to construct a life that feels whole and meaningful.”
The Atlantic5 min readPolitics
Bernie Sanders Lost. But He Won.
The greatest accomplishment of the Sanders campaign has less to do with moving good ideas out of the “radical” category and into the mainstream and more to do with inspiring the people who will carry those ideas forward.
The Atlantic7 min readPolitics
Healing the Rift With Britain’s Jews
When Keir Starmer was elected leader of Britain’s Labour Party last weekend, he was careful to praise his predecessor. “I want to pay tribute to Jeremy Corbyn, who led our party through some really difficult times, who energized our movement, and who