Entrepreneur

Teen Entrepreneurs Learn to Embrace Failure. Can Adults?

Grownup founders can learn plenty from their teenage counterparts.
Source: Courtesy of WIT | Whatever It Takes
Courtesy of WIT | Whatever It Takes

Koby Wheeler has launched and crashed three businesses. But he’s not embarrassed by any of it. “It gives me more confidence,” he says, “because I have those experiences. I know to ask better questions, I know to trust my gut, and I have a more long-term way of thinking.”

It’s a good perspective to have at any age -- and in (WIT), a San Diego–based program that helps high schoolers ideate and launch businesses for college credit, and it puts a heavy emphasis on learning to celebrate their failures.

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