The Guardian

We need to let people study later in life. Ask my dad | Gaby Hinsliff

Not everyone knows what they want to do at 18. So why has the mature student become a dying breed?
Illustration by Matt Kenyon.

This September, one of my oldest friends is going back to school. Three decades on from her last essay crisis, she’ll be back in the land of freshers’ pub crawls and student railcards, in pursuit of a new career that we didn’t even know existed in our 20s. And listening to her talk about summer reading lists, I am seized with an unexpectedly sharp stab of envy. Who doesn’t occasionally dream of turning back the clock and starting over? It should never be too late to experiment with something new, or to unwind decisions blindly made decades

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

Related Interests

More from The Guardian

The Guardian3 min read
Peter Fonda, The Easy Rider Who Tested The Hippy Dream | Ed Vulliamy
The actor was a 60s icon but was also among the first in that era to tackle a bitterly divided America
The Guardian3 min readTech
The Fashion Line Designed To Trick Surveillance Cameras
Adversarial Fashion garments are covered in license plates, aimed at bamboozling a device’s databases
The Guardian3 min read
How Wonderful To Watch Simone Biles' Defiant Joy In Our Dark Times | Candice Frederick
Amid depressing news these days such as abortion bans, mass shootings and rampant Hollywood sexual assault cases, it can be easy to overlook an event so uplifting that it almost sounds like science fiction. Just a few days ago the gymnast Simone Bile