The New York Times

How Much Does Your Education Level Affect Your Health?

Education is associated with better health outcomes, but trying to figure out whether it actually causes better health is tricky.

People with at least some college education have mortality rates (deaths per 1,000 individuals per year) less than half of those without any college education, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In addition, people who are more educated exhibit less anxiety and depression, have fewer functional limitations, and are less likely to have a serious health condition such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease or asthma.

But causality runs both ways. People in poor health from a young age might

This article originally appeared in .

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