Fast Company

DON’T BREAK UP BIG TECH

The platforms have been brutal to startups. But there’s a simpler fix.

This spring, Amazon did something very un-Amazonish.

Across many popular product categories, from batteries to baby food, the retail behemoth quietly discontinued aggressive promotions for its private-label brands, which compete with—and in truth are often near-clones of—independent merchants’ products. It was an uncharacteristic retreat for a company that generally loves nothing more than using every weapon in its substantial arsenal to annihilate its rivals.

Call it the Elizabeth Warren effect. Amid growing public wariness of the biggest tech companies and their outsize role in our economy and public

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Fast Company

Fast Company1 min read
76 For Steering Lyft Users Toward Fun
Jessica Zhang’s role at Lyft is to delight the ride-sharing company’s 30.7 million users—and attract new ones. She does that through collaborations and glitzy events with celebrities like Cardi B and Demi Lovato, while “being careful to make sure we’
Fast Company2 min read
35 For Clearing The Air
Michelle Pfeiffer’s new direct-to-consumer perfume company, Henry Rose—which launched in April—is bringing groundbreaking transparency to a stubbornly opaque industry. Henry Rose offers customers the full ingredient list for each of its inaugural fiv
Fast Company2 min read
29 For Capturing The Moment
Dev Hynes, who performs as Blood Orange, pushes with his words, music, and indeterminate identity against rigid definitions of race, sexuality, and culture. His unstructured aesthetic is his one consistency, whether he’s producing tracks for Solange