The New York Times

Sweden Finds a Simple Way to Improve New Mothers' Health. It Involves Fathers.

The weeks after a mother gives birth are a universally vulnerable period. She is recovering physically and mentally, while dealing with sleep deprivation, round-the-clock caregiving and possibly breast-feeding. Yet after a day or a few days in the hospital, she often doesn’t see a doctor for six weeks.

A new study suggests a way to make a significant difference in mothers’ postpartum health: Give the other parent paid leave, and the flexibility to use it on days the mother needs extra support, even if it just means a couple of days at home.

The researchers, Maya Rossin-Slater and Petra Persson, economists at Stanford, studied the

This article originally appeared in .

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