WellBeing

Mindfulness in the kitchen

When parents are asked what they want for their children, most would give the same answer: happiness. Of course, we all want our children to be happy—and with good reason. Happy kids are healthy kids. Mental health and wellbeing are fundamental to kids’ physical, educational, social, emotional and cognitive development. But unfortunately, many kids are struggling.

According to the Australian Child and Adolescent Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing, one in seven children is diagnosed with some form of mental health condition, including anxiety and depression. Expectations to perform at school and juggle extra-curricular activities have never been higher and family life, often with both parents working, can be hectic.

“Today, children are growing up in a very different world than their parents grew up in,” says Chris Dickson, psychologist from Youthrive. He believes a boom in technology has created a whole new range of issues for children, including online bullying, social media and an amplified pressure to meet the expectations of friends.

How do we help children cope with the pressures of today’s world? Dickson suggests getting “back to basics and building a relationship with your child without technology”.

Getting back

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from WellBeing

WellBeing3 min read
Cardamom
Cardamom, the “queen of spices”, is the world’s third most expensive spice after saffron and vanilla. The first records of its use date back to ancient Sri Lanka, where even today it is an important component of Ayurvedic medicine. Today the largest
WellBeing2 min read
Nourish Your Life
What was the initial vision for Nourished Life? When did it all begin? Nourished Life started as a blog back in 2011. I had decided to go completely toxin free and wanted to share all of these amazing natural products that I’d found to replace my mai
WellBeing10 min readSociety
Natural Therapies And Private Health Cover
The recent removal of 16 natural therapies from the list of treatments approved for private health insurance rebates is one of the most significant measures to affect the Australian natural health landscape in decades. In the aftermath of the ruling,