NPR

How A Baby Caused A Revolutionary Change In Pakistan

It all began when a member of the Balochistan assembly brought her 8-month-old son to a session.
Assemblywoman Mahjabeen Sheran on the day she brought her 8-month-old son to a session in Pakistan's Balochistan province. The secretary of the assembly said babies were against the rules. Source: Ismail Kakar

This is a story about a fussy baby.

But don't worry, it has a happy ending.

On April 29, Mahjabeen Sheran of Balochistan, Pakistan, faced a problem familiar to every working mom.

She had a child care crisis.

The family member who usually watches her 8-month-old son wasn't able to come to Sheran's home. And Sheran had a pressing work obligation. In 2018, she was elected to the parliament in Balochistan, the poorest province in Pakistan with the worst statistics for maternal

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