NPR

Oh Dear: Photos Show What Humans Have Done To The Planet

Some scientists say we've entered a new geological epoch — the anthropocene era — defined by the human impact on the global landscape. Three artists traveled to 22 countries to see what we've wrought.
In Nigeria's oil-rich Niger Delta, oil bunkering — the practice of siphoning oil from pipelines — has transformed parts of the once-thriving delta ecosystem into an ecological dead zone, according to the U.N. Environment Programme. Source: Edward Burtynsky, courtesy Robert Koch Gallery, San Francisco / Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Toronto

Humans have made an indelible mark on the planet. Since the mid-20th century, we've accelerated the digging of mines, construction of dams, expansion of cities and clearing of

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