NPR

Why Safer Cars Don't Lead To Cheaper Car Insurance ... Yet

Many new cars have optional features that can help prevent accidents. But those same features also make repairs more expensive. The result? Premiums can go up for cars that are less likely to crash.
A photo demonstrates safety features in a Volvo XC40. Many new cars have optional features that can help prevent accidents. But those same features can also make repairs more expensive, boosting car insurance premiums. Source: Volvo Car Group

Many new cars sold today can take preemptive action to help prevent crashes — hitting the brakes before a collision, steering around obstacles or alerting drivers to hazards in their blind spots.

Those safety features — collectively known as advanced driver-assistance systems, or ADAS — reduce the risk of crashes. It might seem logical to assume that as a result, they'd reduce the cost of car insurance.

But instead, these advanced safety features can actually drive premiums That's because when such cars do get in crashes, the repairs are more expensive — thanks to the suite of sensors and computers that make these features possible.

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