Los Angeles Times

Hong Kong leader delays unpopular extradition bill, but activists want more

SINGAPORE - A sense of futility pervaded the throngs of protesters in Hong Kong this past week. Many said they chose to demonstrate out of principle, not because they believed they could prevent the passing of an extradition bill that would have left them largely at the mercy of the authoritarian government in Beijing.

Then the unthinkable happened. On Saturday, Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam announced that the proposed legislation she spent months championing would be suspended indefinitely.

The groundswell of resistance, it appears, was too large to ignore.

"There's a sense of victory that at least we were able to stop it for now," said Fernando Cheung, a legislator for the opposition Labor Party who, like many in his camp,

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times5 min read
Under Trump, The US Emphasis On Human Rights Abroad Is Shifting Toward Religious Protections
WASHINGTON - Little by little President Donald Trump and America's top diplomat, Michael R. Pompeo, are revamping the nation's approach to advocating for human rights abroad, cozying up to some of the world's worst offenders and prioritizing religiou
Los Angeles Times4 min readPolitics
Trump's Attacks On Workers Continue
No advocates for workers' rights or labor were especially surprised last week when President Trump nominated Eugene Scalia for secretary of Labor, succeeding the utterly discredited Alex Acosta. Scalia - son of the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin
Los Angeles Times2 min readSociety
LA's Top Water And Power Executive Steps Down In Wake Of FBI Raids, Mayor Says
LOS ANGELES - The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power's top executive stepped down Tuesday, one day after FBI agents raided the utility's downtown headquarters. Mayor Eric Garcetti had announced weeks ago that David Wright, the DWP's general ma