The Paris Review

Redux: In Memoriam, Susannah Hunnewell

Susannah Hunnewell in 2017, at the magazine’s Spring Revel. Courtesy of The Paris Review.

is mourning the loss of our publisher and friend, . Over the course of her long affiliation with the magazine—she began as an editorial assistant in 1989, served as the Paris editor in the early 2000s, and in 2015 became the magazine’s seventh publisher—Susannah conducted several iconic Writers at Work interviews. This week, we’re unlocking all of her interviews:, examined the literary corpus of French provocateur and novelist , and bonded with Parisian nonfiction novelist , who said working with Susannah “left me stunned and admiring.” She’s responsible for two Art of Fiction interviews with Nobel laureates, and , and most recently, she interviewed the translator-couple . Along with these interviews, read Houellebecq’s short story “” and Mathews’s poem “.”

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