The Guardian

After Everest, we have to rethink the places we are loving to death | Van Badham

The solution to overtourism is more than just spreading the crowds more evenly
‘Accumulating with the tonnes of spent oxygen cylinders, tents, gas cartridges, plastic and human turds left by a literal queue of visitors to Everest’s peak, is the globally shared concern with overtourism.’ Photograph: AP

“Everest is over,” declared the Atlantic earlier this month. The conclusion came at the end of a tragic climbing season on the mountain. Eleven new deaths added more bodies to “the world’s highest garbage dump”, even as tourists to the summit posted photos to social media of their passage past corpses that had been there so long, they had become . Accumulating with the tonnes of spent oxygen cylinders, tents, gas cartridges, plastic and human turds left by ais the globally shared concern with overtourism.

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

Related Interests

More from The Guardian

The Guardian3 min read
How Wonderful To Watch Simone Biles' Defiant Joy In Our Dark Times | Candice Frederick
Amid depressing news these days such as abortion bans, mass shootings and rampant Hollywood sexual assault cases, it can be easy to overlook an event so uplifting that it almost sounds like science fiction. Just a few days ago the gymnast Simone Bile
The Guardian16 min readPolitics
The Myth Of Eurabia: How A Far-right Conspiracy Theory Went Mainstream
Once an obscure idea confined to the darker corners of the internet, the anti-Islam ideology is now visible in the everyday politics of the west. How did this happen? By Andrew Brown
The Guardian4 min read
New Museum Tells Gripping Story Of Liberation Of Paris 75 Years On
Basement used by resistance as control centre transformed ahead of anniversary of Nazis surrender