The Atlantic

Legal Abortion Isn’t the Problem to Be Solved

The real problem is that families are primed to see a fetal anomaly as a catastrophe in waiting.
Source: Stephanie Keith / Getty Images

Despite the fear and anxiety that many parents of disabled children initially have, published research shows that—with the proper support—they routinely end up satisfied with their lives and optimistic about their children’s chances for future happiness. Moreover, the lives of adults with impairments are hardly devoid of joy. One of us is able-bodied; the other was disabled by a spinal-cord injury. Because public facilities now have ramps and elevators, we are regularly able to eat out together, frequent local watering holes, and travel to a big city. The same goes for most of our wheelchair-using friends.

The political rhetoric around abortion tells

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