NPR

Instagram Advertising: Do You Know It, When You See It?

"Micro-influencers" work with big companies to sell products on social media. Consumer groups are increasingly concerned that many posts on Instagram and platforms aren't clearly marked as ads.
Source: Thomas White

In the photograph, Gretchen Altman is smiling, leaning back casually, a cup of coffee in hand — Hills Bros. Coffee, to be precise. It looks like a candid shot, but if you hit like, leave a comment, and tag a friend, you can get three different blends of brew, for free.

You've heard of influencers — social media celebrities with massive followings, who get paid to affect consumer tastes. Kim.

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