The Christian Science Monitor

How metalsmith revival is forging better future for a steel town

Standing in the middle of a 19th-century blacksmith shop, part of what was once a bustling steel mill in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, Patrick Quinn is in awe.

“I would have moved to the end of the earth for this space,” he says.

Mr. Quinn points to the soaring octagonal ceiling and the red-brick archways that testify to the architectural heritage of this industrial building. The structure, which had stood vacant since 1992 when the mill closed, is now home to the Center for Metal Arts (CMA), a metalsmithing school. 

CMA draws students from across the country to take classes taught by a roster of visiting instructors as well as by Mr. Quinn, the center’s executive director, and Dan Neville, the associate

Linking back to steel’s historyCapitalizing on Johnstown’s assets

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