The Atlantic

A Documentary That Shows Another Side of Toni Morrison

A new film captures the larger-than-life author in exceedingly human terms.
Source: Timothy Greenfield-Sanders / Magnolia Pictures

One of my white teachers in high school insisted that Toni Morrison would be confusing to me as a reader. So I approached the author’s work with that notion in mind, and quickly realized how wrong my teacher’s assessment was. Morrison’s prose is lush and thick, her plotting complex—but I recognized the characters, the places, the moments. In hindsight, it’s clear that my teacher was unfamiliar with the power and magnitude of the black imagination. When our class finished The Bluest Eye, it wasn’t enough. A group of us turned to Sula, Morrison’s second novel, just so that we could see ourselves again.

“She took the. The film, which opened in select theaters on Friday, is a beautiful, exhaustive, and lovingly personal profile of a brilliant writer who ignited the imaginations of millions.

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

Related Interests

More from The Atlantic

The Atlantic2 min readPolitics
When Public Schools Rely on Local Property Taxes: Letters
Readers discuss the phenomenon of school districts being isolated from financial resources in their communities.
The Atlantic3 min readPolitics
Trump’s Hate Makes the ‘Squad’ Stronger
The president gives his opponents media attention and enhances their influence on American life.
The Atlantic6 min readPolitics
It Matters If Americans Call Afghanistan a Defeat
The public’s judgment about whether the United States won or lost the war will affect civilian-military relations for years to come.