The Atlantic

How American Women Are Amplifying Their Political Power

“I am not interested in building the capacity of people who are in office that want to take away my health care.”
Source: Demetrius Freeman

Alicia Garza’s phone never stops ringing. The Black Lives Matter co-founder now leads Supermajority, a women’s political-training organization, along with a roster of female organizers including Cecile Richards, the former Planned Parenthood Federation of America president. The two have dedicated their efforts to building women’s political power in the U.S., a mandate that means near-constant communication with interested folks across the country.

Speaking yesterday at the Aspen Ideas, Garza spoke about the kinds of women who are most likely to reach out to her with a new enthusiasm for political education or community organizing. “What I see in terms of people who are stepping forward … are people who are not only dismayed about not being involved or not being engaged in the political process, but people who feel like the values that are leading this country right now are off track,” Garza said. “I will be super honest with y’all, I am not interested in building the capacity of people who are in office that want to take away my health care. And I don’t care if you’re a woman or not.” She continued:

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