Bloomberg Businessweek

Dethroning the U.K.’s King of Retail

Philip Green lost his way in the wake of Britain’s biggest corporate #MeToo scandal

Since June, Sir Philip Green, Britain’s so-called king of retail, has been mostly ensconced on his $100 million yacht, Lionheart, off the coast of Monaco. Apart from a game of pingpong on the deck with an unlikely companion—Portuguese soccer star Cristiano Ronaldo—Green has barely been in the public eye after he staved off the collapse of Arcadia Group Ltd., owner of Topshop, one of the U.K.’s best-known clothing chains. But he’s still in the eye of a storm of criticism over sexual harassment allegations and a management style that allowed his retail empire to

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