The Guardian

Permafrost thaw sparks fear of 'gold rush' for mammoth ivory

Prospectors in Russia dig up remains of extinct animals for trade worth an estimated £40m a year
Local officials have warned that an outright ban on harvesting mammoth remains could disenfranchise locals. Photograph: Amos Chapple/RFE/RL

Activists and officials in northern Russia have warned of a “gold rush” for mammoth ivory as prospectors dig up tusks and other woolly mammoth remains that can net a small fortune on the rapacious Chinese market.

Melting permafrost from global heating has made it easier for locals to retrieve the remains of woolly mammoths, which have been

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