NPR

Inside The 'Giant Leap' In Technology It Took To Land On The Moon

President John F. Kennedy first announced the mission to the moon in 1961 — well before the U.S. had the equipment to carry it out.
In this July 20, 1969 photo made available by NASA, astronaut Buzz Aldrin, lunar module pilot, walks on the surface of the moon during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity. (Neil Armstrong/NASA via AP)

July 16 marks the 50th anniversary of the launch of Apollo 11, the first spaceflight to land on the moon. Saturday is the 50th anniversary of the moon landing, a goal that President John F. Kennedy first announced in 1961, well before the United States had the technology to carry out that mission. documents the massive effort to land a man on the moon in his book “.” ‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Fishman () about the technology invented to make the moon landing possible.

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from NPR

NPR2 min read
We Did It For The LOLs: 100 Favorite Funny Books
We thought you might need a laugh right about now, so this year's summer reader poll celebrates all the books (and one short story, and a few uncategorizable gems) that make you laugh out loud.
NPR2 min read
Viking's Choice: Monster Truck Noise-Rock, Dusky Folk, Hypersonic Hardcore
Celtic Frost's "The Usurper" opens this week's playlist of string-swept folk and liquid metal, plus Lightning Bolt's explosive noise-rock, the hypersonic hardcore-punk of Das Drip and more.
NPR5 min readSociety
Restrictions On Abortion Medication Deserve A Second Look, Says A Former FDA Head
The FDA heavily restricted mifepristone — a drug that ends early pregnancies — when it approved it 19 years ago. A former FDA commissioner asks whether the current restrictions should be revisited.