The New York Times

CORRECTION: 36 Hours in Naples, Italy

This article originally appeared in The New York Times.

A city of glorious but tattered beauty, known for its vibrancy and, yes, a frisson of menace, Naples is now humming with visitors. In this Mediterranean capital watched over by the still-kicking Vesuvius volcano, tourist numbers have more than doubled since 2010, crime has dropped (notably, the murder rate is down 44% in 2018 over the previous year, according to the Ministry of the Interior), and the intransigent piles of trash are far fewer. Elena Ferrante’s beloved Neapolitan Novels (and the ongoing HBO adaptation of them) — along with the gritty “Gomorrah” books, movie and TV series — has roused curiosity about a destination long considered little more than a steppingstone to Capri, Ischia and Amalfi. And while the Museo Archeologico, with its extraordinary collection of antiquities, remains a bit neglected, most of the city’s art, culture and social scene are on an optimistic bender, and the charms of Naples — the Baroque excess, the indulgent cuisine, the mesmerizing fugue state of it all — beckon as they did in the city’s Grand Tour glory days.

Friday

1) 3 p.m. Dream home

Naples is a city of masquerades, of staged operas and tromp l’oeil pomp. Acquaint

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

Related Interests

More from The New York Times

The New York Times5 min readFood & Wine
The Keto Diet Is Popular, but Is It Good for You?
Low-carb, high-fat eating can lead to weight loss, but scientists debate the long-term effects on health.
The New York Times4 min readPolitics
Who's to Blame When Algorithms Discriminate?
(The Upshot) When the Fair Housing Act was passed in 1968, the injustice it aimed to root out in the housing market was often egregious: Real estate agents steered black families away from white neighborhoods; landlords refused to rent to them; and p
The New York Times3 min read
How to Plan In Case Things Go Wrong
NOTHING BAD IS GOING TO HAPPEN WHILE YOU’RE ON VACATION ... PROBABLY. Ten days into what would have been two months in South America, I broke my leg in two places. I was deep in Chile, a country whose language I didn’t speak, and I’d just booked fli